Reviews: The Lost Tapes 1982-1992

Photo by Marion Ettlinger

Photo by Marion Ettlinger

It’s an old cliché that sometimes you need to lose something before you really appreciate what you’ve got. In considering Kristina Stykos’ The Lost Tapes 1982 -1992, that sentiment proves doubly true. First, as the Vermont songwriter writes in the album’s liner notes, discovering the collection of discarded demos and unreleased tracks that had sat gathering dust in various closets over the past 30 years was like being reintroduced to old friends, and it brought back a well of emotions she had thought long-buried. And second, I, um, lost her album, which was actually released in late 2011. It recently resurfaced from behind a pile of previously reviewed albums on my desk. My suspect filing habits notwithstanding, I’m delighted the album found its way back to me and imagine it’s a feeling similar to what Stykos experienced when she began exploring her forgotten catalog.” - Dan Bolles, Seven Days

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In the early 1980s, music recording gear became much more affordable and easier to use. With the advent of machines that could record on both sides of a cassette tape, four-track recording, the ability to record four separate tracks, to on tape on a small machine became possible. This was a boon to the budding musician and professional alike. It was fairly simple to use but sophisticated enough that performers like Bruce Springsteen used it, specifically for him on the album, “Nebraska.” Kristina Stykos of Chelsea was a young woman, not yet married and then childless, with dreams of becoming a recording artist. In 1982 she bought a Fostex four-track cassette tape recorder and began recording demo songs she had composed. She did this for a decade until 1992. On the recordings she played piano and guitar.” - Art Edelstein, Times Argus

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